Devon Larratt


NICKNAME: No Limits
HEIGHT: 6’5” / 195.58 cm
WEIGHT: 225 LBS. / 102.15 Kg
COUNTRY: Canada
OCCUPATION: Canadian Armed Forces

PROFILE
Record: 30-3
Hometown: Big Island, Ontario
Favorite Technique: "Bleed and Adapt” Toproll
Rivalries: John Brzenk, Dave Chaffee, Michael Todd
EFT (Elbow to Fingertips): 21.1 inches/53.6 cm

WAL TITLES:
2017 - WAL Championships – 1st Place, Heavyweight - Right Hand
2017 - WAL Championships – 1st Place, Heavyweight – Left Hand
2016 - WAL Northern Regionals – 1st Place, Heavyweight - Right Hand
2016 - WAL Northern Regionals – 1st Place, Heavyweight - Left Hand
2016 - WAL Championships – 1st Place, Heavyweight – Right Hand
2016 - WAL Championships – 1st Place, Heavyweight – Left Hand
2015 - WAL Southern Regionals – 1st Place, Heavyweight - Left Hand
2015 - WAL Championships - 1st Place, Heavyweight - Left Hand
2014 - WAL Championships – 1st Place, Heavyweight - Left Hand



About Devon Larratt
Reared among the farms and forests of Ontario, Canada’s Big Island, Devon “No Limits” Larratt became entranced at an early age with how armwrestling allowed him to let loose in a crush of concentrated power and fury.
 
After honing his 6-foot, 5-inch physique through grueling farm labor, Larratt set off to work in Ontario’s oil fields, where he was schooled in the finer points of the sport, and where he learned that size and strength alone don’t guarantee a victory at the armwrestling table. He continued to compete, hone his technique and stack up the wins after he joined the Canadian military at 21.
 
Larratt competed between repeated deployments to Afghanistan and other missions. Larratt continued to train hard during his combat tours, prepping for the enemies he would face on the table when he returned home. The father of three’s wild youth and adventurous military service fit right in with WAL’s fierce and frenzied competitions. The sport now runs in the veins of the Larratt family: wife Jodi is also a puller. Larratt calls armwrestling a “miniature marshal art,” one with just as many thundering techniques and bruising tactics as any other modern contact sport. “It’s combative strength,” Larratt said. “You can really go hard at a guy. If you like aggression, if you like fighting."